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Beth Barteletti Guides Student Quests to Higher Learning

Completing and filing college applications can be stressful for students and for parents, especially when there is no guarantee of getting into the college of your choice. There are SAT and ACT scores, GPA and activities, essays and visits, and, of course, there is the budget to consider. “How can I get a merit-based scholarship or a free ride?” countless college-bound students want to know.

Luckily, there are professionals who can help navigate such a winding landscape. Beth Barteletti has spent her entire professional career as an educator and is currently the director of College Counseling at International College Counselors in Fort Lauderdale. She occasionally offers free seminars about best practices for getting a student into a college on their list.

Born in Miami, Beth returned home in 2012 after 19 years in the Pacific Northwest to be closer to family. We visited with Beth to learn about her long journey away and back.

A native of Miami Shores and one of six, Beth first attended FSU, then transferred two years later to the University of Dayton (Ohio), where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in communications. She went on to earn a Master’s and Specialist’s degree in school guidance and counseling from the University of Florida.

Following graduation, Beth moved to Portland, Oregon, where she was hired as a school counselor at Jesuit High School. She says it took about a year to get used to the weather in Portland. She spent her first year chilled to the bone, until her Florida wardrobe of shorts and T-shirts was converted to pants, long underwear, and fleece, things often unheard of here in the balmy tropics we call home.

She eventually left Jesuit High School and spent the next 14 years working in the admission office at Reed College, including serving as the Senior Associate Dean of Admission. As such, she managed the reading process for first-year and transfer students, visited dozens of high schools, interviewed hundreds of high school seniors, and read thousands of applications.

During her time at Reed, Beth also taught admission essay writing classes at Saturday Academy and consulted privately with a handful of high school seniors on their college applications.

Upon her return to Miami, Beth again took on the role of college advisor/ guidance counselor, this time at American Heritage School in Plantation, one of the top private high schools in the nation, where she guided hundreds of students to colleges all over the country. She has visited more than 80 colleges and universities in the U.S.

Beth’s current position at International College Counselors allows her to use her entire set of skills to position her student clients on the best path to their future. It may be surprising to learn she can begin helping students as early as eighth grade. Choosing what classes to take in high school and involvement in extracurricular activities can make or break a student’s acceptance to their chosen institution of higher learning, Beth says.

It’s not inexpensive to seek private college counseling, but can be helpful for parents who work full time or who don’t know where to start. Besides, most students likely don’t want their parents’ help. Parents can be a great support to their children as long as they are helping and not taking over the process.

Beth Barteletti is a member of the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) and an associate member of the Independent Educational Consultants Association (IECA).

For more information about private college guidance, go to International College Counselors.  You can email Beth directly here.

Why should I use your firm instead of a larger, institutional advisory firm?

Treece Financial Group provides an advisory relationship that takes pride in  the personal touch. We are a boutique firm that keeps in close touch with our clients. We get to know our clients as individuals and not just accounts. This personal interest creates a level of service which we believe cannot be matched by the larger financial companies and banks.

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